‘The Good Doctor’: Which Cast Member Has the Highest Net Worth?

Which cast member on “TheGood Doctor” is the richest? Here’s what Showbiz Cheat Sheet knows abouttheir millions.

Freddie Highmore

Net worth: $4million

Freddie Highmore made his acting debut in the 1999television movie “Walking on the Moon.” That year, he played the character Samin the movie “Women Talking Dirty.” Highmore landed his first recurringtelevision role in the series “Bates Motel,” in which he played the characterNorman Bates from 2013 to 2017. In 2016, he appeared in the mini-series “Closeto the Enemy.”  His other acting rolesinclude appearances in “Finding Neverland,” “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,”and “Almost Friends.”

Richard Schiff

Net worth: $5million

One of Richard Schiff’s earliest acting roles was in a 1988film titled “Medium Straight.” That year he appeared in an episode of “Cheers.”He landed his first recurring role in the television series “Relativity.”Schiff played the character Barry Roth from 1996 to 1997. His next recurringrole was in “The West Wing,” in which he played the role of Toby Ziegler from1999 to 2006. His other acting roles include appearances in “Murder in the First,”“The Affair,” and “Ballers.”

Antonia Thomas

Net worth: $8 million

Thomas got her big break after starring in the series “Misfits.” She played the character Alisha Daniels from 2009 to 2011. In 2010, Thomas appeared in a television short titled “Stanley Park.” After that, she appeared in a TV mini-series titled “The Deep.” Her other recurring television roles include appearances in “Homefront” and “Lovesick.” Thomas has an estimated net worth of between $8 million and $11 million according to sources around the web.

Fiona Gubelmann

Net worth: $1.5million

Fiona Gubelmann made her acting debut in a 2003 episode of the television series “The Mullets.” After that, she appeared in the 2004 film “Employee of the Month,” in which she played the character Amber. Her first recurring role was in the television series “Wilfred.” She played the character Jenna Mueller. Her other acting roles include appearances in “Mad Men,” “Castle,” “American Housewife,” and “Lucifer.”

Hill Harper

Net worth: $1.5 million

Hill Harper made his acting debut in a 1993 episode of the televisionseries “Life Goes On,” in which he played a nurse. The following year, heappeared in an episode of “Renegade” titled “South of 98.” Harper landed hisfirst recurring role in the television series “Married…with Children.” He playedthe character Aaron from 1993 to 1994. His other acting roles include appearancesin “City of Angels,” “CSI: NY,” “Covert Affairs,” “Limitless,” and “Homeland.”

The rest of “The Good Doctor” cast’s net worth

How rich are the rest of “The Good Doctor” cast members?There wasn’t much reliable information out there for stars Christina Chang, NicholasGonzalez, and Will Yun Lee. Hopefully, we’ll see more about them in the future.

Read more: ‘TheGood Doctor’: How Do You Manage Awkward Interactions After an Office RomanceEnds?

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Surgeons determine which part of women's breasts are most stared at

Peeky Finders: Plastic surgeons use eye-tracking technology to determine which part of women’s breasts are most stared at by both sexes (spoiler: it’s the nipples)

  • Breast aesthetics are key to the results of cosmetic and reconstructive surgery
  • However, surgeons may have different ideas of attractiveness to their patients
  • Researchers asked 100 men and women to assess eight different breast types
  • Tracking their gaze may facilitate an objective measure of breast attractiveness

When looking at breasts, both men and women stare at the area around the nipples the most, plastic surgeons have determined using eye-tracking technology. 

The findings may help improve the outcomes of both cosmetic and reconstructive surgery by providing a more objective measure of breast aesthetics.

Three quarters of ‘gaze time’ was focused on the lower breast and nipple areas, which received the most attention from men and women, the researchers found.

Furthermore, people are most likely to glance towards the so-called nipple-areola complex, which was found to be the ‘most common point of initial fixation’.

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When looking at breasts, both men and women stare at the area around the nipples the most, plastic surgeons have determined using eye-tracking technology, as pictured

‘Thanks to objective analysis of observer’s gaze pattern, eye-tracking technology may provide a better insight into the visual perception of breast aesthetics and symmetry,’ said paper author Piotr Pietruski of the Memorial Hospital, Warsaw.

In the study, 50 men and 50 women were asked to assess the aesthetics and symmetry of eight types of female breasts which varied in terms of size and degree of ptosis, or ‘sagging’.

The team used the eye tracking tech to determine which parts of the bosoms each person looked at — and for how long.

They found the key characteristics of gaze patterns in women and men were ‘essentially the same’, despite some differences based on the sex of the observer and the type of breast being observed.

‘Surprisingly, the upper regions of the breast generally didn’t attract the observers’ attention — although men paid more attention to the upper breast than women did,’ said Dr Pietruski.

The question of what makes breasts attractive is important for plastic surgeons and patients, the researchers said, with mind to both cosmetic and reconstructive breast procedures.

But for the breasts — as with other areas of the body — surgeons and patients may have differing ideas around attractiveness.

Eye-tracking technology thus provides a tool for a more objective assessment of factors affecting visual attention and attractiveness.

The findings may help improve the outcomes of both cosmetic and reconstructive surgery by providing a more objective measure of breast aesthetics (stock image)

‘The findings, especially those around “attention-capturing time”, may identify factors affecting breast attractiveness,’ said Dr Pietruski.

‘These data may be helpful for [the] understanding and subsequent standardisation of subjective breast assessment procedures, and perhaps might even facilitate surgeon-patient communication regarding priorities of the surgery,’ he added.

‘It needs to be stressed that we still do not know how the visual pattern parameters translate on a subjective assessment of breast attractiveness.’

The study adds to the findings of previous plastic surgery research using eye-tracking that similarly aimed to identify factors affecting breast attractiveness.

In the study, 50 men and 50 women were asked to assess the aesthetics and symmetry of eight types of female breasts which varied in terms of size and degree of ptosis, or ‘sagging’

Researchers at Stanford University, for example, found that restoring the nipple-areola complex played an important role in re-establishing normal viewing patterns of reconstructed breasts after mastectomy.

‘We were able to understand what specifically patients were looking at, and also understand where we can improve our results,’ said Stanford paper author and plastic surgeon Gordon Lee.

‘By understanding the gaze pattern of patients pre-operatively and post-operatively, we can target our surgical procedures to achieve the optimal symmetry.’

Plastic surgery in America

Nearly 18 million plastic surgery procedures were performed in the US in 2017, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Prevalence of cosmetic surgery has continues to grow across the last decade, with a two percent increase between 2016 and 2017.

More than $16 billion on cosmetic procedures in 2016, but only about four percent of Americans say they have gotten work done. 

The top five surgical procedures in 2017 were:

 The top five minimally invasive procedures in 2017 were: 

 Source: American Society of Plastic Surgeons 

‘By looking at where a participant’s gaze is directed, we can see what their attention is being drawn to – whether it be a scar, a shadow, a fold or a crease,’ added co-author of the Stanford University study Rahim Nazerali.

‘This technology allows us to enhance certain features or disguise parts of the procedure area to provide the patient with the best possible outcome.’

The full findings of the study were published in the journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 

 

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